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August 6, 2014
08:29 EDTMYOSMYOS' Fortetropin for muscle growth shows positive results in published trial
MYOS has published a white paper providing additional results of its clinical trial designed to study the effects of Fortetropin in conjunction with modest resistance training in male subjects. The trial examined the effects of Fortetropin on skeletal muscle growth, lean body mass, strength, and power in recreationally trained individuals. Results demonstrated a statistically significant increase in both muscle thickness and lean body mass in subjects taking Fortetropin compared to placebo. Strength and power endpoints significantly increased from baseline in all study groups. Additionally, a statistically significant decrease in fat mass in subjects in the 19.8 g arm was noted.
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January 22, 2015
08:12 EDTMYOSMYOS study of Fortetropin mechanism of action shows regulatory effects
MYOS announced that its mechanism of action studies have identified three key molecular signaling pathways in which Fortetropin exhibits regulatory effects. In addition to reducing serum myostatin levels, MYOS recently completed a preclinical mechanism of action study that demonstrated Fortetropin's activity in mTOR and Ubiquitin, two other crucial signaling pathways in the growth and maintenance of healthy muscle. In addition to myostatin regulation, MYOS' preclinical data also showed that Fortetropin up-regulates the mTOR regulatory pathway. The mTOR pathway is responsible for production of a protein kinase related to cell growth and proliferation that increases skeletal muscle mass. Up-regulation of the mTOR pathway is important in preventing muscle atrophy. Fortetropin's ability to affect the mTOR pathway may have a significant impact in treating patients suffering from degenerative muscle diseases and suggests that Fortetropin-based products may help slow muscle loss secondary to immobility and denervation. Finally, the company's recent animal model study demonstrated that Fortetropin acts to reduce the synthesis of proteins in the Ubiquitin pathway, a highly selective, tightly regulated system that serves to activate muscle breakdown. Over-production in the Ubiquitin pathway is responsible for muscle degradation. Fortetropin's ability to regulate production in the Ubiquitin pathway may have significant implications for repairing age-related muscle loss and for patients suffering from chronic diseases causing cachexia.

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