New User:

-or-
Username:
Password:
Forgot your password?

Stock Market & Financial Investment News

News Breaks
March 10, 2014
08:54 EDTHEBHemispherx wins federal lawsuit regarding investment banking fees
Hemispherx Biopharma announced after more than a week in trial, a federal jury in Atlanta took only an hour to determine there was no merit to a brokerage firm's claim that Hemispherx owed the firm over $6M for commissions from private sales of stock in 2009. MidSouth Capital, sued Hemispherx in 2010 for commissions it claimed it was due under the terms of a 2008 contract which Hemispherx never signed. Investment bank Rodman & Renshaw sold more than $31M worth of Hemispherx stock in mid-2009. Rodman & Renshaw was promptly paid the commission it was due under the terms of its engagement agreement. MidSouth, whose brokers, Rob Rosenstein and Adam Cabibi, were terminated after they failed to secure a closing on several failed convertible debenture proposals, also demanded payment of a commission on the subsequent Rodman & Renshaw stock sale.
News For HEB From The Last 14 Days
Sign up for a free trial to see the rest of the stories you've been missing.
January 26, 2015
08:34 EDTHEBHemispherx reports genetic changes in Ebola may impede potential treatments
Hemispherx Biopharma announced that in a new publication in the journal mBio, scientists at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease, or USAMRIID, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, studied genetic changes in the Ebola virus, or EBOV, circulating in West Africa and concluded that genomic drift of the EBOV over time may be sufficient to block the action of otherwise potential therapies that target EBOV genetic sequences. The types of potential drugs at risk include monoclonal antibodies and small-interfering RNA which are scheduled to be evaluated during the current outbreak. The two platform drugs of Hemispherx, Alferon N and Ampligen, both experimental therapeutics in a setting of Ebola disease, have recently both demonstrated anti-EBOV activity and have mechanisms of action which are multifaceted by working through cellular "molecular cascades" rather than by targeting viral protein or genetic sequences whose specificity is vulnerable to mutational change as reported by the research consortium on January 20. Although none of the experimental drugs have been approved by the FDA, certain of the experimental therapeutics discussed in the USAMRIID/Harvard/MIT report, are being used to treat small numbers of patients under a World Health Organization, or WHO, emergency protocol. The potential impact of genomic drift on development of therapeutics for EBOV disease has already been realized for other pathogenic human virus, such as HIV and influenza. The large genetic and antigenic diversity seen in HIV has been a "major stumbling block" for development of preventative vaccines.

Sign up for a free trial to see the rest of the stories you've been missing.

I agree to the theflyonthewall.com disclaimer & terms of use